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International education

EDUC 6601 International and Comparative Education
EDUC 6602 Regional Studies in International Education
EDUC 6610 Programs and Policies in International Education
EDUC 6620 Strategies and Analysis in International Education
EDUC 6630 International Experiences
EDUC 6631 Internship: International Education
EDUC 6640 Selected Topics in International Education
EDUC 6660: Capstone in International Education

Master’s in International Education

To ensure constructive leadership and improvements in our global community, we must address critical education issues concerning education reform and social justice on a world-wide scale. Whether it is through an emphasis on formal schooling, higher education institutions, or education in war zones, refugee camps, nomadic villages, and other unusual settings, international education professionals are prepared to bring about improvements in developing education systems. This program is designed for persons who are entering or advancing in positions associated with training, education, adult learning, and development activities in diverse settings that require international understanding. At GW, a Master’s degree in International Education gives you the opportunity to choose from three specializations: international higher education, international education development, and global education.

International Higher Education

Global Education

International Education for Development

Students acquire knowledge of other countries and cultures, using the education system as a means of interpreting and translating knowledge across cultures and analysis of the formal and non-formal school systems as they reflect history, culture, development, values, contemporary concerns, and future trends. In addition, students acquire tools, methods, and habits of analysis that enable them to play a variety of roles as leaders and change agents. GW’s International Education program recognizes the importance of rich theoretical perspectives, but also steps out into the complexities of the real world through examining the actual practice of education in specific regional contexts.

This program houses the GW UNESCO Chair for International Education & Development, one of only two education schools selected from world-wide competition. Learn more about the mission and activities associated with this prestigious honor.

Students interested in teaching English may enroll concurrently in the International Education Masters program and the Graduate Certificate in Teaching English Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). Courses can be applied toward earning the Masters degree and certificate. Students may also complete an IIE certificate or an ATM certificate. Students enrolled in the International Education program are able to obtain a Masters of Arts (MA) in Education and Human Development and a graduate certificate in Assessment, Testing, and Measurement with no additional coursework. This will involve simultaneous dual enrollment in the MA in IEP and the ATM certificate. In addition to the courses listed on the Assessment, Testing, and Measurement certificate page, students would take EDUC 6116: Introduction to Educational Statistics to fulfill their research requirement.

What is the role of business and foundations in supporting efforts to expand international education?

A: The business and philanthropic communities share the onus, as well as the opportunity and privilege, of promoting some of the best practices that can be found in international education for the purposes of encouraging broader replication and directing their funding towards some of these best practices.

To the extent that international education reflects some of the backgrounds of children from diverse populations, it’s a positive for them to be in an environment where they can see and be exposed in a very proud way to their own history and culture. I think our traditional education approach, which tends to be more monolithic, stands to gain tremendously in terms of effectiveness with disadvantaged kids if they can see their own cultures represented in the curriculum in a very positive way.

We also think that children from diverse backgrounds will benefit from the larger educational gains that come from high-quality, international-based education content, that there can be a significant gain in the basic reading, writing, and math skills that we worry about so much, and very often these kids unfortunately are not able to benefit from creative strategies to promote their gains.

Are there other ways in which you make learning of Japanese relevant to the lives of American teenagers?

I also have a fairly interesting third/fourth year project in one of my two alternating curricula that looks at how American products are marketed in Japan. So you take McDonald’s or you take Denny’s or Dominos, and things that we have here, they’re also in Japan. How does culture affect marketing? My students did a phenomenal job the first time we went through this, just really digging in and finding out how culture affects something as simple as marketing. What’s appealing to the Japanese as a society? How is that really deeply reflected in the culture? And it’s all done through the language.

It’s a lifelong process. It’s something that I want to instill in them, that this is something that you will carry with you for as long as you choose to keep it going. It’s never done, you never finish learning a language, in the same way that I have to look up words in English or I have to continue to read and keep up on things. It doesn’t change in that fashion.

Yes, the [Japanese] writing system can be daunting, but even now, with the age of technology, we can have a reading proficiency of these languages, regardless of the fact of whether or not we have to actually hand-write them. Now with the technology, we can type in these characters as long as you know how they sound, they will come out in the correct fonts. You can choose, OK, this is the kind of character I want to mean what I’m saying, it really has allowed us to become much more facile and to be able to have the communications abroad. So even if that is one obstacle, we’re very much in a position now that that can be overcome. It is a lifelong journey and it needs to start as young as possible, and if high schools can attempt that beginning, all the better.

Sources:

https://gsehd.gwu.edu/programs/masters-international-education
https://www.edutopia.org/perspectives-international-education
https://www.edutopia.org/perspectives-international-education
International education

More and more, families are embracing international education to enrich their children’s lives by exposing them to a multicultural learning environment that fosters understanding, promotes an appreciation for different cultures and perspectives, and supports positive change in the world.

Students at TASIS

Why I chose the MA in International Education and Development – Florence de Voijs

Your qualification should preferably be in education, development studies or a social science. You may also be considered for the course if you have a qualification in another subject area or work experience in the development sector or teaching.

Argentina

Your qualification should preferably be in education, development studies or a social science. You may also be considered for the course if you have a qualification in another subject area or work experience in the development sector or teaching.

Australia

Your qualification should preferably be in education, development studies or a social science. You may also be considered for the course if you have a qualification in another subject area or work experience in the development sector or teaching.

Azerbaijan

Your qualification should preferably be in education, development studies or a social science. You may also be considered for the course if you have a qualification in another subject area or work experience in the development sector or teaching.

Bahrain

Your qualification should preferably be in education, development studies or a social science. You may also be considered for the course if you have a qualification in another subject area or work experience in the development sector or teaching.

Bangladesh

Your qualification should preferably be in education, development studies or a social science. You may also be considered for the course if you have a qualification in another subject area or work experience in the development sector or teaching.

Brazil

Your qualification should preferably be in education, development studies or a social science. You may also be considered for the course if you have a qualification in another subject area or work experience in the development sector or teaching.

Brunei

Your qualification should preferably be in education, development studies or a social science. You may also be considered for the course if you have a qualification in another subject area or work experience in the development sector or teaching.

Canada

Your qualification should preferably be in education, development studies or a social science. You may also be considered for the course if you have a qualification in another subject area or work experience in the development sector or teaching.

Chile

Your qualification should preferably be in education, development studies or a social science. You may also be considered for the course if you have a qualification in another subject area or work experience in the development sector or teaching.

China

Your qualification should preferably be in education, development studies or a social science. You may also be considered for the course if you have a qualification in another subject area or work experience in the development sector or teaching.

Colombia

Your qualification should preferably be in education, development studies or a social science. You may also be considered for the course if you have a qualification in another subject area or work experience in the development sector or teaching.

Cyprus

Your qualification should preferably be in education, development studies or a social science. You may also be considered for the course if you have a qualification in another subject area or work experience in the development sector or teaching.

Denmark

Your qualification should preferably be in education, development studies or a social science. You may also be considered for the course if you have a qualification in another subject area or work experience in the development sector or teaching.

Ecuador

Your qualification should preferably be in education, development studies or a social science. You may also be considered for the course if you have a qualification in another subject area or work experience in the development sector or teaching.

Egypt

Your qualification should preferably be in education, development studies or a social science. You may also be considered for the course if you have a qualification in another subject area or work experience in the development sector or teaching.

France

Your qualification should preferably be in education, development studies or a social science. You may also be considered for the course if you have a qualification in another subject area or work experience in the development sector or teaching.

Germany

Your qualification should preferably be in education, development studies or a social science. You may also be considered for the course if you have a qualification in another subject area or work experience in the development sector or teaching.

Ghana

Your qualification should preferably be in education, development studies or a social science. You may also be considered for the course if you have a qualification in another subject area or work experience in the development sector or teaching.

What is international education?

The criteria for an international education offered by the International Baccalaureate® (IB) might be summarized as a "…comprehensive approach to education that intentionally prepares students to be active and engaged participants in an interconnected world." This approach to teaching and learning incorporates a global perspective by providing several different views of the same topic or learning experience.

Learn or master a language

Studying abroad or in an international school accelerates fluency in speaking, reading, and writing a foreign language by providing students with the opportunity to hone their language skills in the classroom and through interaction with their multilingual peers. International schools may offer a bilingual program or a wide variety of languages taught through their curriculum. Students can not only become fluent in more than one language but will also be academically prepared for future study in another language.

Experience different styles of education

Most international schools offer curricula that are recognized around the world, however, each country has its own education system. Moved out of their "comfort zone," students are helped to adapt within a new but supportive learning environment. This early experience will serve them well in the future by making them more versatile in the workplace, with the confidence to meet new challenges and the ability to adjust to different management styles.

Learn about other cultures and perspectives

An international experience allows students to expand their worldview and develop cross-cultural awareness and international-mindedness by enhancing their understanding of different cultures, perspectives, and views. By interacting with peers and teachers with different backgrounds and upbringing, students will begin to value each one’s unique story and develop a more holistic approach to life’s experiences, both at school and in the future. Understanding and appreciating the diversity of cultures and perspectives worldwide helps students become compassionate, open-minded, global citizens who can lead change in the world.

International education promotes a healthy questioning of personal beliefs, and the influence of their own culture and upbringing. It helps students create and maintain bonds with others who may be from a different culture. Students learn to value the diverse contributions of others as they hone their problem-solving and communication skills. The development of self-confidence, self-awareness and an enhanced ability to adapt to diverse environments and perspectives will provide them with long-term benefits.

Develop a global network of life-long friends and connections

Developing and maintaining a network of friendships or professional relationships with people from all over the world is undoubtedly a life-enriching experience that will stay with students forever. The wider the network, the greater the likelihood that students will be exposed to exciting career and social opportunities.

Discover the world

International education offers a wide range of exciting experiences to see and understand the world through travel, engagement with schools from other countries, and connections with people from around the world.

International schools often develop academic travel programs as an integral part of their curriculum, enabling students to experience a new country and culture. International schools may be connected to and engage with other schools globally, offering opportunities to interact with their linked communities. Organized events celebrating different customs, cuisines, holidays, and more are part of daily school life. Exposure to these activities is intrinsic to an international student’s development.

Impress universities and future employers

According to figures from a study by the Institute of International Education (IIE-Abroad Survey) and the University of California, between 90% and 95% of students with an international education found work in their sector within the six months following their graduation.

Students can use their international school experience to demonstrate to future employers that they have the open mind, adaptability, resourcefulness, and drive needed in an ever-changing work environment. These attributes improve employability and give a competitive edge in the workforce.

Identify opportunities for leadership development and community service

Through co-curricular activities, academic travel programs, and community service initiatives, international schools offer a vast array of opportunities for students to develop leadership skills and contribute to society, locally and globally. Students are encouraged to use their knowledge and talents to make an impact and lead change.

Watch the webinar replay: Outstanding early years education for international families with Melodi Jordan, Head of Lower School, TASIS The American School in England, and Carmen Powell, children’s author and education professional, in conversation with Fiona Murchie

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Sources:

https://www.sussex.ac.uk/study/masters/courses/international-education-and-development-ma
https://www.relocatemagazine.com/articles/relocate-international-schools-fair-autumn-21-tasis-england-nine-benefits-of-international-education-for-students
https://www.american.edu/sis/news/20180306-whats-the-importance-of-international-education.cfm

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